Simple interior with stool and decorations on white wall backgro
MSP Generation terrorists
 

Manic Street Preachers, Generation Terrorists

£60.00

After cycling through a number of rejected ideas (including photographer Andres Serrano’s 1987 work Piss Christ, and resurrecting The Durutti Column’s idea to house their 1980 debut, The Return Of The Durutti Column, in a sandpaper sleeve), Manic Street Preachers settled on a doctored image of founding member and lyricist Richey Edwards. Still in keeping with the band’s love of flirting with religious imagery, Jesus on The Cross can still be seen hanging from a leather necklace, against Edwards’ bare chest. His real-life tattoo bore the slogan ‘useless generation’. In an era where hard rock would soon be forced to make way for grunge, the sleeve for Generation Terrorists sits perfectly between the two: too rock to be considered wholly indie, and too androgynous to be considered wholly rock. In the wake of Edwards’ disappearance, on 1st February 1995 (the day he was due to fly to the US to promote arguably the band’s finest album, 1994’s The Holy Bible), the image has come to be much romanticised by the Manics’ fiercely loyal fanbase.

SKU: ATHA0086 Categories: ,
 

Description

After cycling through a number of rejected ideas (including photographer Andres Serrano’s 1987 work Piss Christ, and resurrecting The Durutti Column’s idea to house their 1980 debut, The Return Of The Durutti Column, in a sandpaper sleeve), Manic Street Preachers settled on a doctored image of founding member and lyricist Richey Edwards. Still in keeping with the band’s love of flirting with religious imagery, Jesus on The Cross can still be seen hanging from a leather necklace, against Edwards’ bare chest. His real-life tattoo bore the slogan ‘useless generation’. In an era where hard rock would soon be forced to make way for grunge, the sleeve for Generation Terrorists sits perfectly between the two: too rock to be considered wholly indie, and too androgynous to be considered wholly rock. In the wake of Edwards’ disappearance, on 1st February 1995 (the day he was due to fly to the US to promote arguably the band’s finest album, 1994’s The Holy Bible), the image has come to be much romanticised by the Manics’ fiercely loyal fanbase.