Simple interior with stool and decorations on white wall backgro
Rush, Permanent Waves
 

Rush, Permanent Waves

£60.00

A masterpiece of collage art, the Permanent Waves album cover is a composite of four different photos. The main image displays Hurricane Carla’s ravaging of the Texas coastline on 11th September 1961, as captured by US photojournalist Flip Schulke, who stood at the corner of Seawall Boulevard and 3rd Street, in Galveston, to document the destruction. Serenely walking away from the debris is model Paula Turnball, who was photographed separately and placed on top, symbolising, in drummer Neil Paert’s words, Rush ‘forging on regardless, being completely uninvolved with all the chaos and ridiculous nonsense that’s going on around us’. Rush’s longtime art director Hugh Symes was also included, waving in the background as he leans on a lamppost. A copy of the Chicago Tribune’s 3rd November 1940 edition can be seen in the foreground, though the publishers threatened legal action until Rush altered the paper’s erroneous ‘Dewey Defeats Truman’ headline. Coca-Cola, too, asked that their logo be removed from the billboard visible on the far right.

SKU: ATHA0156 Categories: ,
 

Description

A masterpiece of collage art, the Permanent Waves album cover is a composite of four different photos. The main image displays Hurricane Carla’s ravaging of the Texas coastline on 11th September 1961, as captured by US photojournalist Flip Schulke, who stood at the corner of Seawall Boulevard and 3rd Street, in Galveston, to document the destruction. Serenely walking away from the debris is model Paula Turnball, who was photographed separately and placed on top, symbolising, in drummer Neil Paert’s words, Rush ‘forging on regardless, being completely uninvolved with all the chaos and ridiculous nonsense that’s going on around us’. Rush’s longtime art director Hugh Symes was also included, waving in the background as he leans on a lamppost. A copy of the Chicago Tribune’s 3rd November 1940 edition can be seen in the foreground, though the publishers threatened legal action until Rush altered the paper’s erroneous ‘Dewey Defeats Truman’ headline. Coca-Cola, too, asked that their logo be removed from the billboard visible on the far right.